Group Therapy

 

In group therapy, people meet face-to-face with me to talk about what is troubling them. Members also give feedback to other group members by expressing their own feelings about what someone says or does. This interaction gives group members an opportunity to try out new ways of behaving and to learn more about the way they interact with others.

 

Why does group therapy work?

 

During group therapy, people begin to see that they are not alone. Many people feel they are alone in that they have serious problems, and it is encouraging to hear that other people have similar difficulties.

 

When people come into a group and interact freely with other groups members, they usually recreate those difficulties that brought them to the group in the first place. Under skilled direction of a therapist like myself, the group is able to give support, offer alternatives, or gently confront the person. In this way, the difficulty becomes resolved, alternate behaviors are learned and the person develops new ways of relating to others and their confidence and self esteem are increased.

 

In the climate of trust provided by a therapy group, people feel free to care about and help each other. Trust is developed as each member demonstrates their commitment to the group and their respect for the rights and feelings of others.

 

What do I talk about when I am in group therapy?

 

You will talk about what brought you to therapy in the first place. Tell the group members what is bothering you. If you need support, let the group know. If you think you need confrontation, let them know this also. It is important to tell people what you expect of them.

 

Unexpressed feelings are a major reason why people experience difficulties. Revealing your feelings - self disclosure - is an important part of group therapy and affects how much you will grow. While the “safety” of the group permits you to express feelings that are often very difficult to express outside the group, you will not be forced to tell your deepest or most personal thoughts. How much you talk about yourself depends upon what you are comfortable with. You are ultimately the person responsible for how much you share. If you have any questions about what might or might not be helpful, you can always ask.

Information

 

Group therapy is limited to eight people or less.

2010 - present

2010 - present

Rhodes Counseling • 1545 Hotel Circle South, Suite 250, San Diego, CA 92108 • Phone 619.248.2630 • Email

This site was designed with the
.com
website builder. Create your website today.
Start Now